PRESS AND TERRORISM IN NIGERIA: A DISCOURSE ON BOKO HARAM

I. S. Popoola

Abstract


This paper is a political communication discourse on terrorism with specific reference to the emergence of the Boko Haram religious sect in Nigeria and the dangers it poses to press freedom in the country. In spite of the provisions in Article 22 of the Nigerian 1999 constitution which provide for objective, truthful and comprehensive coverage of newsworthy activities in Nigeria, the activities of the Boko Haram sect have emerged as the greatest threat to press freedom in the country. The article in question states that "the press, radio, television and other agencies of the mass media shall at all times be free to uphold the fundamental objectives contained in this chapter and uphold the responsibility and accountability of the government to the people." The killing of some journalists by the sect has, however, intimidated Nigerian journalists, who now tread cautiously to avoid being eliminated by the sect. After an elaborate treatment of press and terrorism in colonial and post-colonial Nigeria, the paper recommends a thorough overhauling of all the security agencies in the country to prevent a return of Thomas Hobbes’ state of nature in Nigeria.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5789/6-1-82

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